When you find your path, you will also find your love story. People today are consumed by doubts about their relationships: Have I found the right partner? Am I being true to myself? Have I given the best part of myself away? As a result, there is a restless kind of consumer shopping for partners, as if the “right” one can be found by toting up a potential mate’s pluses and minuses until the number of pluses matches some mythical standard. The path to love, however, is never about externals. However good or bad you feel about your relationship, the person you are with at this moment is the “right” person, because he or she is a mirror of who you are inside. Our culture hasn’t taught us this (as it has failed to teach us so much about spiritual realities). When you struggle with your partner, you are struggling with yourself. Every fault you see in them touches a denied weakness in yourself. Every conflict you wage is an excuse not to face a conflict within. The path to love therefore clears up a monumental mistake that millions of people make—the mistake that someone “out there” is going to give (or take) something that is not already yours. When you truly find love, you find yourself.
   
Therefore the path to love isn’t a choice, for all of us must find out who we are. This is our spiritual destiny. The path can be postponed; you can lose faith in it or even despair that love exists at all. None of that is permanent; only the path is. Doubt reflects the ego, which is bound in time and space; love reflects God, eternal divine essence. The ultimate promise on the path to love is that you will walk in the light of a truth extending beyond any truth your mind presently knows.

Deepak Chopra (via mindofataurus)
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  • 7 hours ago
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Rejecting another human being simply because they are human, has become a collective neurosis. People ask, “When will my soul mate get here?” But praying for the right person is useless if we’re not ready to receive him. Our soul mates are human beings, just like we are, going through the normal processes of growth. No one is ever “finished.” The top of one mountain is always the bottom of another, and even if someone meets us when we feel “on top” of things, the chances are good that very soon we’ll be going through something that challenges us. It is our commitment to growth that makes this inevitable. But the ego doesn’t like the look of people when they’re “going through things. It’s unattractive.

As in every other area, the problem in relationships is RARELY that we haven’t had wonderful opportunities or met wonderful people. The problem is, we haven’t known how to take the greatest advantage of the opportunities we’ve had. Sometimes we didn’t recognize at the time how wonderful those people were. Love is all around us. The ego is the block to our awareness of love’s presence. The idea that there is a perfect person who just hasn’t arrived yet is a major block. Our vulnerability to the myth of “Mr. Right” stems from our glorification of romantic love. The ego uses romantic love for its “special” purposes, leading us to jeopardize our relationships by overvaluing their romantic content.

The difference between a friendship and a romance can be illustrated with the image of a long stemmed rose. The stem is the friendship; the blossom the romance. Because the ego is sensation-oriented, our focus automatically goes to the blossom. But all the nourishment that the blossom needs in order to live reaches it through the stem. The stem might look boring in comparison, but if you take the blossom off the stem it will not last for long.

Marianne Williamson (via mindofataurus)
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  • 8 hours ago
  • 1372

Rejecting another human being simply because they are human, has become a collective neurosis. People ask, “When will my soul mate get here?” But praying for the right person is useless if we’re not ready to receive him. Our soul mates are human beings, just like we are, going through the normal processes of growth. No one is ever “finished.” The top of one mountain is always the bottom of another, and even if someone meets us when we feel “on top” of things, the chances are good that very soon we’ll be going through something that challenges us. It is our commitment to growth that makes this inevitable. But the ego doesn’t like the look of people when they’re “going through things. It’s unattractive.

As in every other area, the problem in relationships is RARELY that we haven’t had wonderful opportunities or met wonderful people. The problem is, we haven’t known how to take the greatest advantage of the opportunities we’ve had. Sometimes we didn’t recognize at the time how wonderful those people were. Love is all around us. The ego is the block to our awareness of love’s presence. The idea that there is a perfect person who just hasn’t arrived yet is a major block. Our vulnerability to the myth of “Mr. Right” stems from our glorification of romantic love. The ego uses romantic love for its “special” purposes, leading us to jeopardize our relationships by overvaluing their romantic content.

The difference between a friendship and a romance can be illustrated with the image of a long stemmed rose. The stem is the friendship; the blossom the romance. Because the ego is sensation-oriented, our focus automatically goes to the blossom. But all the nourishment that the blossom needs in order to live reaches it through the stem. The stem might look boring in comparison, but if you take the blossom off the stem it will not last for long.

Marianne Williamson (via mindofataurus)
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